Crop circle recently discovered in Comly’s English grammar (1812).
Strange circular mark appearing just within the cropped region of leaf D2 in John Comly’s English grammar, made easy to the teacher and pupil: originally compiled for the use of West-town Boarding School, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: Kimber and Conrad, 1812). Whether it was created by aliens or mischievous college students, authorities have yet to say.

Crop circle recently discovered in Comly’s English grammar (1812).

Strange circular mark appearing just within the cropped region of leaf D2 in John Comly’s English grammar, made easy to the teacher and pupil: originally compiled for the use of West-town Boarding School, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: Kimber and Conrad, 1812). Whether it was created by aliens or mischievous college students, authorities have yet to say.

Member of the opposition found dead in Swett’s English grammar (1843).
Member of the opposition found dead in Josiah Swett Jr.’s, An English grammar; comprehending the principles and rules of the language (Windsor: Published by Josiah Swett, Jr., 1843). Grammatical authorities reported that they could not ascertain the precise date of death, noting only that the opposition had been crushed some time ago.

Member of the opposition found dead in Swett’s English grammar (1843).

Member of the opposition found dead in Josiah Swett Jr.’s, An English grammar; comprehending the principles and rules of the language (Windsor: Published by Josiah Swett, Jr., 1843). Grammatical authorities reported that they could not ascertain the precise date of death, noting only that the opposition had been crushed some time ago.

For Germans learning English in colonial America (1751).
Title page from Christoph Saur ‘s Eine nutzliche anweisung oder beyhulfe vor die Teutschen um Englisch zu lernen… Nebst einer grammatic, … (Germantown: Christoph Saur, 1751). Written for speakers of German, this one of the earliest English grammars printed in America. Editions printed in 1747 and 1750 have been recorded by Evans (6075; 6455) and Alston (II, 401; II, 402), but no copies have ever been located.

For Germans learning English in colonial America (1751).

Title page from Christoph Saur ‘s Eine nutzliche anweisung oder beyhulfe vor die Teutschen um Englisch zu lernen… Nebst einer grammatic, … (Germantown: Christoph Saur, 1751). Written for speakers of German, this one of the earliest English grammars printed in America. Editions printed in 1747 and 1750 have been recorded by Evans (6075; 6455) and Alston (II, 401; II, 402), but no copies have ever been located.

A former slave teaches the world Kanuri grammar (1854).

Former slave Ali Eisami Gazirma’s teachings formed the basis of Sigismund Koelle’s Grammar of the Bornu or Kanuri language (London: Church Missionary House, 1854). Gazirma was a teacher and interpreter for Koelle, a Christian missionary.

"My interpreter, who furnished me with the materials on which the grammar is based is ‘Ali Eisami Gazirma, i. e. Ali of Gazir, whose mother was Eisa, or, according to his English name, William Harding, a man of good common sense, of more than ordinary strength of memory, and of an unblameable moral character, although he is merely a baptised Christian, without making any special profession of religion. The portrait facing the title page faithfully represents him, as he was sitting with me in my study, from eight to twelve and from one to four, day after day, during the sixty-first, sixty-third, and sixty-fourth years of his age.” (page vii, preface) Pictured above is the engraved frontispiece and title page.