Marcio, Valdés, Coriolano, y Torres hablan de la gramática (1737).
First page of Juan de Valdés Diálogo de la lengua. Written in the early 16th century, Valdés’ Castilian grammar did not appear in print until Gregorio Mayáns y Siscár included the text in his Origenes de la lengua Española, Tomo II (Madrid: Por Juan de Zuñiga, 1737). Diálogo de la lengua offers linguists an important window into how Castilian was spoken in the 16th century.

Marcio, Valdés, Coriolano, y Torres hablan de la gramática (1737).

First page of Juan de Valdés Diálogo de la lengua. Written in the early 16th century, Valdés’ Castilian grammar did not appear in print until Gregorio Mayáns y Siscár included the text in his Origenes de la lengua Española, Tomo II (Madrid: Por Juan de Zuñiga, 1737). Diálogo de la lengua offers linguists an important window into how Castilian was spoken in the 16th century.

The other kind of wood type (1878).
Lessons with letter-logs in Alonzo Reed’s and Brainerd Kellogg’s Higher lessons in English. A work on English grammar and composition, in which the science of the language is made tributary to the art of expression. A course of practical lessons carefully graded, and adapted to every day use in the school-room (New York: Clark & Maynard, Publishers, 1878).

The other kind of wood type (1878).

Lessons with letter-logs in Alonzo Reed’s and Brainerd Kellogg’s Higher lessons in English. A work on English grammar and composition, in which the science of the language is made tributary to the art of expression. A course of practical lessons carefully graded, and adapted to every day use in the school-room (New York: Clark & Maynard, Publishers, 1878).

A lady of letters (1715).
Linguist and scholar Elizabeth Elstob included her portrait in the initial that begins her Anglo-Saxon grammar entitled, The rudiments of grammar for the English-Saxon tongue, first given in English: with an apology for the study of northern antiquities. Being very useful for the understanding of our ancient English poets, and other writers (London: Printed by W. Bowyer, 1715). Elstob’s book is the first Anglo-Saxon grammar written in English. Her preface explains, “Considering the Pleasure I myself had reaped from the Knowledge I have gained from the Original of our Mother Tongue, and that others of my own Sex, might be capable of the same Satisfaction: I resolv’d to give them the Rudiments of that Language in English dress” (ii).

A lady of letters (1715).

Linguist and scholar Elizabeth Elstob included her portrait in the initial that begins her Anglo-Saxon grammar entitled, The rudiments of grammar for the English-Saxon tongue, first given in English: with an apology for the study of northern antiquities. Being very useful for the understanding of our ancient English poets, and other writers (London: Printed by W. Bowyer, 1715). Elstob’s book is the first Anglo-Saxon grammar written in English. Her preface explains, “Considering the Pleasure I myself had reaped from the Knowledge I have gained from the Original of our Mother Tongue, and that others of my own Sex, might be capable of the same Satisfaction: I resolv’d to give them the Rudiments of that Language in English dress” (ii).