The library’s only desk (1726).
You had to arrive early if you wanted to use the library’s one and only desk. There was an extra chair, but that was reserved for the elderly. Headpiece from Pierre Guarin’s Grammaticae Hebraicae et Chaldaicae, ex optimis quae hactenus prodierunt, nova facilique methodo concinnatae, tomus II (Paris: Typis Jacobi Collombat, 1726-1728).

The library’s only desk (1726).

You had to arrive early if you wanted to use the library’s one and only desk. There was an extra chair, but that was reserved for the elderly. Headpiece from Pierre Guarin’s Grammaticae Hebraicae et Chaldaicae, ex optimis quae hactenus prodierunt, nova facilique methodo concinnatae, tomus II (Paris: Typis Jacobi Collombat, 1726-1728).

Deciduous doodles (1796).
On April 4th, 1802, Amasa Paine from Gloucester Rhode Island doodled these wonderfully expressive trees on the fly leaf Noah Webster’s A grammatical institute of the English language; comprising an easy, concise and systematic method of education designed for the use of English schools in America. In three parts. Part second (Hartford: Hudson & Goodwin, 1796).

Deciduous doodles (1796).

On April 4th, 1802, Amasa Paine from Gloucester Rhode Island doodled these wonderfully expressive trees on the fly leaf Noah Webster’s A grammatical institute of the English language; comprising an easy, concise and systematic method of education designed for the use of English schools in America. In three parts. Part second (Hartford: Hudson & Goodwin, 1796).

Spine Label No. 8: Hebraicae Grammatices Rudimenta (1807).
A number 8 painted on the slender spine of Richard Busby’s Hebraicae grammatices rudimenta. In usum Scholae Westmonasteriensis (London: Sumptibus Gulielmi Ginger; T. Plumber, Printer, 1807). There’s some speculation that the spine’s artistry is the handwork of that guy from Sesame Street who paints numbers on everything.
This is the 8th spine in the series, posted on 8/8/2014.

Spine Label No. 8: Hebraicae Grammatices Rudimenta (1807).

A number 8 painted on the slender spine of Richard Busby’s Hebraicae grammatices rudimenta. In usum Scholae Westmonasteriensis (London: Sumptibus Gulielmi Ginger; T. Plumber, Printer, 1807). There’s some speculation that the spine’s artistry is the handwork of that guy from Sesame Street who paints numbers on everything.

This is the 8th spine in the series, posted on 8/8/2014.

Grammar grows on trees (1854).
Don’t ever let anyone tell you that grammar doesn’t grow on trees. It’s all here in an Illustrated diagram entitled “The Tree of Knowledge or Key to Grammar,” from O. S. Knapp’s Grammar without a Master; or Key to Grammatical Conversation (Boston: Dayton & Wentworth, 1854; frontispiece). And yes, I was pretty sure before I wrote this post that it’s unlikely that anyone ever told anybody else that grammar actually grows on trees.

Grammar grows on trees (1854).

Don’t ever let anyone tell you that grammar doesn’t grow on trees. It’s all here in an Illustrated diagram entitled “The Tree of Knowledge or Key to Grammar,” from O. S. Knapp’s Grammar without a Master; or Key to Grammatical Conversation (Boston: Dayton & Wentworth, 1854; frontispiece). And yes, I was pretty sure before I wrote this post that it’s unlikely that anyone ever told anybody else that grammar actually grows on trees.